A Day In Life as a Management Trainee

By Mina

 

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Put bags away and quickly sipping my cup of tea.

 Go to the back room and start scanning out the boxes as the other Management Trainees (MT) start putting boxes away in their bins.

Once done, print out the list and check it twice. Make sure there are no extra boxes left over.

Help out fellow MTs with returned merchandise to make sure the blinds were correctly fixed. Everything is fine and in working order. Yay!

 10 AM. It’s show time.

“Good morning. Do you need any help?”

This is my daily routine as a MT, but that is as far as it gets structurally until the end of the day.  In between, I have to take customers and guide them through the process of choosing the best products for them. Since each customer is different and has various needs for their rooms, there is no “standard” way of helping them.  One customer may need a lot of time since she does not know what she needs in a particular room.  Another customer might know exactly what she wants since she has something similar in other rooms and just want to match it. Then, there are those that need the whole house done, whereas others just need one shade. Every customer is different and we, as MTs, have to help them since we are the experts. As you can imagine, it does sound overwhelming especially when you are just starting out. Don’t worry though because there are other MTs in your team who will help you and guide you throughout the day.

 

When there are down time in the store, meaning there are few to no customers coming in, you are training other MTs by giving feedback, constructive criticisms, and helping them achieve their goals. For example, I am a quiet person who doesn’t really like talking to people who I didn’t know. In order for me to strike up a conversation, I would have to know you for a long time. As you can tell, that won’t get me anywhere in life. If I can’t sell blinds because I don’t want to talk to random strangers, then I certainly can’t do anything else outside like networking. Other MTs gave me that feedback and suggestions on what I can do. I listened, so one of the first things I did was to understand what the customer wants by asking questions about the room, the type of functions that she wants, and how she wants the room to look. The second thing I did was to smile more. Those two basic things are not hard at all. It became easier the more I practice on various customers and MTs. On the forefront of my mind, I had to remind myself to smile and ask questions until it became natural to me. Once that feedback is crossed off, I have to move on to the next one I get from my peers. There will always be something that I can do better to improve on my team, my sales, and myself.

 

Before you know it, the whole day has gone by. Now I have to delegate and help out so that we can close up for the night.  I make a mental list of what needs to be done before the end of the day.

 

Check orders – Done

Trash – Done

Close the register – Done

Vacuum the carpet – Done

Check all doors are locked – Done

Check to see how much you sold for the day – Done

Go home for the night.

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“BUILDING A GREAT COMPANY …ONE PERSON AT A TIME”

Blinds To Go wants to help you become successful! That’s why we have our award winning management training programs, to teach you valuable skills that will help you learn and grow as an individual and in a team.

THE PURPOSE OF THIS BLOG IS TO DISCUSS ALL THINGS CAREER RELATED WITHIN BLINDS TO GO. OUR EMPLOYEES WILL GIVE THEIR EXPERIENCES TO DATE, ALONG WITH SHARING HOW YOU CAN ALSO BECOME PART OF A WINNING TEAM.

 

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